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11 November transport

November 20th: Universal Children’s Day

Why not bring Universal Children’s Day into your classes this November?

In this lesson for teen or adult learners B1 level upwards, learners will:

  • discuss childhood
  • discuss their impressions of two photographs
  • watch a video about Universal Children’s Day
  • imagine an event to mark the occasion at their school or workplace

Have you used this lesson? Why not keep in touch?

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02 February adults B1 C1 Social life solutions transport Winter Cycling Day

February 14th: Winter Bike to School and Work Day

Is it a cold February with you? Perhaps you are thinking about Valentine’s Day. Or maybe you are lucky enough to live in a hot country where it is warm and sunny. Did you know that February 14th is Winter Bike to Work Day? Perhaps you still walk or cycle to school or work, or maybe you opt for a car or the bus. If you are lucky enough to live somewhere hot, then hopefully your bicycle is ready to go! In recognition of everyone who keeps cycling or walking to work or school this winter, why not teach this lesson based around a video from Sustrans, a UK organisation that promotes non-motorised eco-friendly transport?

In this lesson learners will:

  • Discuss how they travel and the benefits of certain kinds of transport
  • watch a video and do comprehension tasks
  • explore collocations from the video
  • do a roleplay based on a situation related to the video.

Level: B1 upwards

Materials: a projector and these slides. You can download them before class if connection is an issue.

Just click on the slides below at the bottom right and follow the steps.

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06 June Activism B1 C1 cars health June 20th: Clean Air Day transport

Clean Air Day: I Like Clean Air

This lesson plan is based on the excellent campaign ‘I Like Clean Air’ in which London parents and kids  fight pollution. Students discuss air pollution, listen to a fantastic song created for the campaign, read and analyse a letter by a child requesting a change to improve air quality and learn how to write a letter asking for something to be done about an issue important to them.

Language level: Pre-Intermediate (A2) upwards

Learner type: Primary and Secondary Young Learners

Time: 90 minutes

Outcomes:

  • Language: Learners can differentiate between and use correctly complex and simple expressions for a transactional letter.
  • Skills: Learners write a letter requesting action to improve their cities air quality
  • Content: Learners explore the issue of air quality and become empowered to take action on it.

Materials:

  • Presentation in PowerPoint Air Quality lesson or the online presentation below
  • 1 copy of the song lyrics I Like Clean Air for the teacher
  • 1 copy of I Like Clean Air worksheet per student. Air quality Lesson Plan

Procedure:

  1. Ask students to discuss in groups what they love about their city and what they don’t love about it. Feedback to class and put ideas on the table in the PowerPoint.
  2. Tell learners that students in London produced a song about their city. Students Brainstorm 3 things they might love about London and 3 things they don’t love. Feedback to class and add ideas to the table on slide 2.
  3. Listen to the song. http://www.ilikecleanair.org.uk/clean-air-song/ What is it about?
  4. Give out the worksheet I Like Clean Air Students read it, predict what the missing words are. They listen to the song again to check.
  5. Students read the letter on the accompanying PowerPoint slide 4 and answer the following: Who is it from? Who is it to? What is it about? What is the format?
  6. Elicit from students what expressions the writer of the letter uses to ask someone to do something. Then go to slide 5 on the PowerPoint and students match up the simple and complex phrases according to function. Elicit the pros of more complex language (more precise meaning) and the cons (can be less clear).
  7. Ask what air quality issues there are in the students’ town or city. Who could they contact to do something about it? Complete the table on slide 6 and add ideas.
  8. Students write a letter to a person of their choice on an air quality issue of their choice. This can be displayed on the classroom walls for the other students to read and then hand in.

More information on Clean Air Day here: https://www.cleanairday.org.uk/Default.aspx

Thank you to Shazia from I Like Clean Air for permission to use the materials on http://www.ilikecleanair.org.uk/